Friday, 2 November 2018

How to develop a growth mindset






Psychologist Carol Dweck is one of the world's leading authorities on motivation. Throughout her career she's focused on why some people succeed and others fail.

In her TedTalk (above) - Developing a Growth Mindset - Dweck explains that those who have a fixed mindset believe that their intelligence and abilities are static and that they don't have the capacity to change. On the other hand, those with a growth mindset know that these qualities can be continually developed and improved through hard work and persistence. 

In adults returning to work, a fixed mindset can manifest itself in thoughts like "I'm too old to move into a new area", "I'm hopeless with new technology" or "I'm no good at networking". Remaining open to growth and self improvement will greatly improve your chances of success in finding a satisfying and fulfilling role.

How to adopt a fixed mindset

1. Believe in the power of 'not yet'. In her TedTalk, Dweck gives the example of a school in Chicago which replaced a 'fail' grade with 'not yet' and saw a huge improvement in student performance. If your job application is rejected, a 'not yet' attitude can stop you from giving up and encourage you to explore different option and strategies to achieve your goal.
2. Don't see obstacles that stand between where you are now and where you want to be as immovable barriers, but rather as challenges or hurdles to overcome - opportunities to develop new skills and acquire more experience.
3. Seek out feedback with an open mind. We know it's difficult, but try not to see negative feedback as a judgement of your competence but rather as an opportunity to learn and grow. Listen to what family, friends and former colleagues tell you, and make sure you ask for specific feedback if your job application is rejected after interview. What you learn can help you make changes to bring you closer to success next time around.
4. Take action. Adopting a growth mindset means believing in the power of neuroplasticity, that the brain can continue to make new connections in adulthood or strengthen connections that you haven't used for a while. You can help to realise your own potential through learning new skills or practising ones that are a bit rusty.
5. Move out of your comfort zone. Conquering something that scares you is a useful way to teach yourself that you can grow and move forward. Celebrate your successes and seek out yet more opportunities to challenge yourself! 


Carol Dweck is the author of Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential


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